Fort Picklecombe Dive Site Review

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Posted September 21, 2012 by admin in

Date Visited: 09/09/2009
 
 

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Plenty to see including reef, marine life and stunning views of Plymouth Sound
 

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Can get chilly and windy! Brrr!
 

The Fort Picklecombe dive site is home to a stunning reef with plenty of marine life. I was lucky enough to spot some large starfish, dead crabs, sea cucumber and plenty of underwater sand formations. There was a large variety of fish to be seen although I was gutted not to have seen the infamous […]

Rating

Underwater Attractions
76%


Water Visibility
54%


Site Facilities
0%


Price
100%


Total Score
58%


by admin
Full Article

The Fort Picklecombe dive site is home to a stunning reef with plenty of marine life. I was lucky enough to spot some large starfish, dead crabs, sea cucumber and plenty of underwater sand formations. There was a large variety of fish to be seen although I was gutted not to have seen the infamous ‘Tom Pot Blenny’.
It’s a great dive site for those who think the UK doesn’t hold anything decent under it’s many waves.

History of Fort Picklecombe
Fort Picklecombe was commissioned in the mid 19th century by Lord Palmerston, Foreign Secretary and then Prime Minister under Queen Victoria. Being an island, Great Britain was at risk from large scale enemy invasion by sea, particularly from France. Palmerston ordered a series of coastal forts and batteries to be built in this area to defend the large naval base at Devonport near Plymouth. The coastal entrance to Plymouth is known as Plymouth Sound, and was to be defended by Fort Picklecombe to the west, Fort Bovisand to the east, and a smaller fort on the Plymouth Sound breakwater. Guns were removed from the fort in the 1920s but after the outbreak of the World War II it was reactivated and manned by the Coastal Artillery. Just down the coast to the west of the fort range finder and searchlight positions were made. The remains of these positions still remain today. After the war, the fort was decommissioned and it stood derelict for many years. Eventually it was offered for sale to property developers and in the early 1970s it was converted to 103 residential apartments.


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